Carbon dating web series

Linda Palmer-Cardone co-director and producer of Carbon Dating gave a great interview for . Some folks involved in Carbon Dating who attended the Burbank International Film Festival last year have a nice red-carpet photo in the article! Check it out!

Methuselah's tree ring sequence near its core -- when it was a young tree -- was matched to the sequence found in pieces of nearby trees which had died previously. Dr. Henry Michael of the University of Pennsylvania's Museum Applied Science Center for Archaeology (MASCA) scanned the area almost every summer for over three decades. His goal was to find sections of dead trees whose rings could be pieced together to extend the samples as far back in time as possible. He found  an irregular slab from a bristlecone pine that spanned the years 3050 BCE to 2700 BCE. The tree ring sequence adjacent to the slab's bark matched the sequence near Methuselah's core.

The entire process of Radiocarbon dating depends on the decay of carbon-14. This process begins when an organism is no longer able to exchange Carbon with their environment. Carbon-14 is first formed when cosmic rays in the atmosphere allow for excess neutrons to be produced, which then react with Nitrogen to produce a constantly replenishing supply of carbon-14 to exchange with organisms.


Carbon dating web series

Carbon dating web series



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